Wabi-Sabi: the beauty of imperfections

A Japanese philosophy that aims to create an interior design based on authenticity and peace of mind.


Images via Pinterest


There is no such a thing as perfection, they say… but as an interior designer, and in my personal life, I tend to pay attention to details and do everything that I do with extreme care. Going against my nature, this week I want to talk to you about Wabi-Sabi, an interior design style that does not focus on achieving perfection, on the contrary, it is a celebration of the beauty of imperfections. As we face another week at home due to the Corona virus and things are not perfect at all for many reasons, I’m sure this Japanese trend will inspire you a moment of peace and harmony and who knows? Perhaps your next home renovation.


Images via Pinterest


Wabi-Sabi may be considered the Japanese answer to Scandinavian Hygge style (if you haven’t, you can read more on my blog post here). It is an ancient philosophy and its meaning is hidden within the word “wabi” – natural simplicity, understated rustic elegance, living with humility – and “sabi”, referring to imperfection or seeing beauty in the flaws that come with age. The way it can be interpreted is about the pursuit of authenticity, joy and beauty in the way things are, no matter how old or out of fashion they may be and without worrying about how things could be.


Images via Pinterest


When applied to interior design and décor, a wabi-sabi home is authentic, harmonious and yes, imperfect. Old rustic furniture or vintage decorations find their place in a home that is not obsessed with the latest interior design colour or trend. In a world where we are too often obsessed with perfection, wabi-sabi promotes tranquillity. I know it may sound like an abstract concept but let’s see how you can apply this philosophy to your home in the #CanaryIslands. You can embrace imperfection with the Japanese art of kintsugi that introduces broken and damaged pottery and vases mended with gold or silver resin, a celebration of fragility and the beauty within the damage. Alternatively, think about artisanal furnishings and handmade accessories for your home.